E²SHI Associates Receive Discovery and Catalyst Awards

E²SHI congratulates Discovery Award and Catalyst Award recipients that have been announced by President Ronald Daniels and Provost Robert Lieberman in late June and early July 2015. Among the recipients, three are E²SHI Associates and two other faculty members who are researching environment and energy challenges.

The Discovery Awards are part of a $15 million commitment to cross-divisional faculty-led research at Johns Hopkins University over the next three years. The Catalyst Awards support promising research and creative endeavors of early-career faculty at Johns Hopkins.

One of the broadest collaborations selected for the Discovery Award is an effort led by E²SHI Associate Director, Dr. Cindy Parker, with faculty from the schools of Public Health (SPH), Engineering, and Arts and Sciences, and SAIS to model the effects of climate change on the global food system. See below for the list of E²SHI Associates that have received a Discovery or Catalyst Award.  

Discovery Awards

Cindy Parker, E²SHI Associate Director, Department of Environmental Health Sciences (SPH) and Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (KSAS), for “modeling the effects of climate change on the global food system.” With Jonathan Haskett (Energy, Resources & Environment Program, SAIS), Ben Hobbs (Geography & Environmental Engineering, WSE), Roni Neff (Environmental Health Sciences, SPH), Sauleh Siddiqui (Civil Engineering, WSE), and Ben Zaitchik (Earth & Planetary Sciences, KSAS).

Catalyst Awards

Dennice Gayme, Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Electrical and Computer Engineering (WSE), for “Extending a wall-turbulence modeling framework to complex fluids.”

Naveeda Khan, Department of Anthropology (KSAS), for “GIS and Remote Sensing for Riparian Life in Bangladesh."

 

Other faculty (non-E²SHI Associates) who received Catalyst Awards for their research on environment and energy related topics are:

Naomi Levin, Department of Earth & Planetary Sciences (KSAS), for “A million years of climate change in Eastern Africa.”

Chao Wang, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (WSE), for “Electrochemical oxidation and conversion of methane.”

 

Learn more about the Discovery Award program

Learn more about the Catalyst Award program

Of all the offspring of time, Error is the most ancient, and is so old and familiar an acquaintance, that Truth, when discovered, comes upon most of us like an intruder, and meets the intruder’s welcome.
— Charles MacKay