Science to Solutions in Food, Energy and Water Security

Due Date: 06/07/2017

How can the protection of nature help secure food, energy and water – and enhance the quality of life – for 10 billion people? The Science for Nature and People Partnership (SNAPP) takes on this key challenge and believes that successful solutions cannot be achieved by any single organization acting alone. Whether you focus on human health or ecological health, adaptation to climate change or a humanitarian crisis, SNAPP announces its 2017 Request for Proposals to convene interdisciplinary teams, and invites you to be a part of the solution.

SNAPP provides funding to bring together teams of 12-18 people from diverse organizations that we refer to as working groups. SNAPP working groups meet intensively in 3-4 in-person collaborative sessions (lasting 3-5 days each) over the course of 18-24 months. Between sessions, team members collaborate remotely to publish research, develop implementation tools and products, and support decision-makers’ use of the results.

SNAPP working groups include experts from any academic discipline to synthesize data relevant to their work, from indigenous knowledge to satellite imagery or anything in between. They also include key people poised to make changes in the humanitarian, development and conservation sectors and influence policy at national and international levels.

While this year’s Request for Proposals remains open to globally important issues at the interface of conservation, development and human well-being, proposals centered on climate and sanitation themes are especially welcome.

SNAPP funds the convening of working groups but does not cover salary of individual working group members.

Eligibility

Researchers and practitioners of any nationality affiliated with an academic, governmental agency, multilateral, or not-for-profit institution may submit a SNAPP proposal. Individuals operating independently are also eligible to apply.

Learn more about this opportunity > >

When there's a huge spill of solar energy, its just called a nice day.
— Adam Browning, Vote Solar